A program of the Lawrence Hall of Science that seeks to increase ocean literacy through informal and formal education initiatives
Marine Activities, Resources & Education

WHOI News

Coral Larvae Use Sound to Find a Home on the Reef

Researchers found that the soundscape of a reef—the combined sounds of all animals living nearby—might play a major role in steering corals towards healthy reef systems and away from damaged ones.

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt 'Off the Charts' Compared With Past Four Centuries

Surface melting across Greenland’s mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec. 5, 2018, in the journal Nature.  The study provides new evidence of the impacts of climate change on Arctic melting and global sea level rise.

 

Flounder Now Tumor-free in Boston Harbor

In the late 1980s, more than three-quarters of the winter flounder caught in Boston Harbor—one of the most polluted harbors in America—showed signs of liver disease, many of them with cancerous tumors. But now, a scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has documented a dramatic rebound in flounder health spurred by decades of remediation efforts.

Alvin Submersible Makes 5,000th Dive

Alvin, the country's only deep-diving research submersible capable of carrying humans to the sea floor, reached another milestone in its long career on Nov. 26, 2018, when the sub made its 5,000th dive during an expedition to the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.

NMEA Educator of Year Award

Craig Strang, the Founding Director of MARE, received the National Marine Educator of the Year award at the 2005 National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) Conference in Maui, Hawaii. This prestigious award is given to an individual who makes a significant contribution to marine education at the local, regional, or national level. The award was given to Craig during the 20th year of MARE (16 years at the Lawrence Hall of Science and 4 additional years as Project OCEAN at the Oceanic Society in San Francisco). Craig has been a leader in marine education for over 20 years, and an inspiration to many. The following are excerpts from his nomination letter:

"Craig’s inspiration created Project OCEAN 20 years ago and 14 years ago he guided Project OCEAN's rebirth as MARE at UC Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science. MARE has become one of the longest-running and effective multi-disciplinary marine education curricula in the nation. Over the past 20+ years, thousands of children, parents, teachers and administrators have been introduced to and captivated by the power of the ocean in science and literacy education."

"Craig serves as the Center Director for the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE) California and served as the Chairperson of the National COSEE Network in 2003 and 2004.  He was nominated by his peers from the 7 COSEE Centers across the nation for two successive terms. Craig has provided leadership with charm and grace over this period and has become a key leader in a multi-agency and organizational effort to define ocean literacy and set benchmarks for ocean science learning. In this role he has been instrumental in strategic national planning efforts and co-led the Ocean Literacy Campaign since 2003 resulting in the development of Ocean Literacy: The Essential Principles of Ocean Sciences Grades K-12.  The ocean literacy brochure is being circulated widely and is getting significant play right now!"

Craig's colleagues offered further support in his nomination for this award:

“One of the things that brings power to Craig's work … is his breadth and depth of understanding not only of marine education, but of its relationship to education in general as well as the evolving social and political scene.”

“His leadership on the COSEE Council came at a critical time as the COSEE centers try to define their role in providing marine education and resources to enrich the public's understanding of the ocean. Craig's work as a marine educator is appreciated and revered by all who have had the opportunity to work with him.”