A program of the Lawrence Hall of Science that seeks to increase ocean literacy through informal and formal education initiatives
Marine Activities, Resources & Education

WHOI News

Mountain Erosion May Add Carbon Dioxide to Atmosphere

Scientists have long known that steep mountain ranges can draw carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere—as erosion exposes new rock, it also starts a chemical reaction between minerals on hill slopes and CO2 in the air, “weathering” the rock and using CO2 to produce carbonate minerals like calcite.

Atlantic Ocean Circulation at Weakest Point in 1,600 years

New research led by University College London (UCL) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) provides evidence that a key cog in the global ocean circulation system hasn’t been running at peak strength since the mid-1800s and is currently at its weakest point in the past 1,600 years. If the system continues to weaken, it could disrupt weather patterns from the United States and Europe to the African Sahel, and cause more rapid increase in sea level on the U.S. East Coast.

WHOI Among First Funding Recipients of The Audacious Project

What if we explored the ocean’s vast twilight zone, teeming with undiscovered life?  Today, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) was awarded $35 million—the largest philanthropic gift in the Institution’s history—to do just that. The award comes from The Audacious Project, a bold new philanthropic collaboration housed at TED to fund critical ideas that have potential to create massive, global change.

School Vacation Week Activities in Woods Hole

Stop by to learn about science and engineering at WHOI through videos and interactive exhibits. Drop by for special school vacation activities.

Penguins Go Through the Flow

Colonies of breeding king penguins behave much like particles in liquids do, according to new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and international colleagues. This "liquid " organization and structure enables breeding colonies to protect themselves against predators while also keeping members together.

Blogs We Like

Teachers At Sea

In spring 2014, MARE prepared two teachers for a teacher-at-sea experience on board the Scripps Institute of Oceanography research vessel, the R/V Melville. The month-long ocean acidification-focused research cruise, led by Chief Scientist William Cochlan of San Francisco State University, will travel from San Francisco, CA to Seattle, Washington.

You can follow the cruise and the adventures of the two selected educators:

at Twitter and through their blog posts as noted above.