A program of the Lawrence Hall of Science that seeks to increase ocean literacy through informal and formal education initiatives
Marine Activities, Resources & Education

WHOI News

Rare Find from the Deep Sea

For the first time ever, a team of international researchers were given the rare opportunity to observe and film a dumbo octopus—measuring just a few centimeters—hatching from its egg during an expedition to explore a chain of underwater mountains off the U.S. East Coast in 2005. Their findings were published Feb. 19, 2018, in the journal Current Biology.

Monitoring Bacteria on Whale Skin

Just like with humans, the skin on marine mammals serves as an important line of defense against pathogens in their environment. A new study sheds light on the skin microbiome—a group of microorganisms that live on skin—in healthy humpback whales, which could aid in future efforts to monitor their health.

WHOI Spins Off Local Technology Start-up

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is selling its controlling interest in EOM Offshore, a mooring systems company based on technology developed by engineers at WHOI. The company was founded as a start-up in 2010 to commercialize highly stretchable, fatigue-resistant hoses to transmit power and data to and from undersea sensors.

WHOI Center for Marine Robotics Receives NextGEN Award

The Center for Marine Robotics at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) was chosen to receive a NextGEN award by the Massachusetts TechHUB Caucus.

Scientists Pinpoint How Ocean Acidification Weakens Coral Skeletons

The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable.

Blogs We Like

Teachers At Sea

In spring 2014, MARE prepared two teachers for a teacher-at-sea experience on board the Scripps Institute of Oceanography research vessel, the R/V Melville. The month-long ocean acidification-focused research cruise, led by Chief Scientist William Cochlan of San Francisco State University, will travel from San Francisco, CA to Seattle, Washington.

You can follow the cruise and the adventures of the two selected educators:

at Twitter and through their blog posts as noted above.