A program of the Lawrence Hall of Science that seeks to increase ocean literacy through informal and formal education initiatives
Marine Activities, Resources & Education

WHOI News

Rare Find from the Deep Sea

For the first time ever, a team of international researchers were given the rare opportunity to observe and film a dumbo octopus—measuring just a few centimeters—hatching from its egg during an expedition to explore a chain of underwater mountains off the U.S. East Coast in 2005. Their findings were published Feb. 19, 2018, in the journal Current Biology.

Monitoring Bacteria on Whale Skin

Just like with humans, the skin on marine mammals serves as an important line of defense against pathogens in their environment. A new study sheds light on the skin microbiome—a group of microorganisms that live on skin—in healthy humpback whales, which could aid in future efforts to monitor their health.

WHOI Spins Off Local Technology Start-up

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is selling its controlling interest in EOM Offshore, a mooring systems company based on technology developed by engineers at WHOI. The company was founded as a start-up in 2010 to commercialize highly stretchable, fatigue-resistant hoses to transmit power and data to and from undersea sensors.

WHOI Center for Marine Robotics Receives NextGEN Award

The Center for Marine Robotics at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) was chosen to receive a NextGEN award by the Massachusetts TechHUB Caucus.

Scientists Pinpoint How Ocean Acidification Weakens Coral Skeletons

The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable.

National Policy for Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts and the Great Lakes

To Whom It May Concern,
The National Ocean Council recently released a draft implementation plan for President Obama's National Policy for Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts and the Great Lakes. You can view the draft policy and submit comments at the NOP website.

The public comment period is open until midnight EST, February 27, 2012 and ocean education topics are mainly on Pages 23-25. Action 6 on page 24 directly addresses Increasing Ocean Literacy. The first Milestone is: "Include ocean concepts in the Next Generation Science Standards."

This is huge to have the President and the National Ocean Council calling for Ocean Literacy to be incorporated into the mainstream K-12 science curriculum.

The first draft of the Next Generation Science Standards will be released for public review in March. Please help by reviewing and commenting on the draft, and by encouraging other parents, teachers, science educators and concerned citizens to also review and comment. Please let these people know that the President and the National Ocean Council have added their voices to the call for Ocean Literacy in the Next Generation Science Standards.

On behalf of Lawrence Hall of Science, the National Marine Educators Association, the NSF-funded Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence and the rest of the Ocean Literacy Campaign organizers, I encourage you all to make your voice heard. Please make sure that you review the draft standards with the Ocean Literacy Framework in mind. You can prepare by taking a visit to www.oceanliteracy.net where you can find, as always, Ocean Literacy: The Essential Principles of Ocean Sciences K-12 and the Ocean Literacy Scope & Sequence for Grades K-12.

Regards,

Craig

Craig Strang, Lawrence Hall of Science, COSEE CA, NMEA President-Elect